February 2018 Member Webinar: Marginal Means, Your New Best Friend

by Jeff Meyer

Interpreting regression coefficients can be tricky, especially when the model has interactions or categorical predictors (or worse – both).

But there is a secret weapon that can help you make sense of your regression results: marginal means.

They’re not the same as descriptive stats. They aren’t usually included by default in our output. And they sometimes go by the name LS or Least-Square means.

And they’re your new best friend.

So what are these mysterious, helpful creatures?

What do they tell us, really? And how can we use them?

In this webinar, we’ll address these important questions and more, like:

— Can they be produced for interactions?
— How can we generate them?
— Does all statistical software produce the same results?
— If not, how are the results different?

We’ll get in under the hood to understand how marginal means are produced. We’ll also show examples for linear, logistic and count models. And we’ll compare and contrast the output from SPSS, R, SAS and Stata.

You’ll learn when and how to best use marginal means to make your results make sense – to you and to your audience.

Note: This webinar is only accessible to members of the Statistically Speaking Membership Program.

Date and Time

Wednesday, February 14, 2018
3 pm – 4:30 pm (US EST) (In a different time zone?)

About the Instructor

Jeff Meyer is a statistical consultant, instructor and writer for The Analysis Factor.

Jeff has an MBA from the Thunderbird School of Global Management and an MPA with a focus on policy from NYU Wagner School of Public Service.

Not a Member Yet?

It’s never too late to join the hottest stats club around.

Just head over to our enrollment page to sign up for Statistically Speaking.

You’ll get exclusive access to this month’s webinar, plus live Q&A sessions, a private stats forum, 50+ video recordings of past webinars, and more.

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