Share

by Kim Love

If you are like I was for a long time, you have avoided learning R.

You’ve probably heard that there’s a steep learning curve, and that the available documentation is not necessarily user-friendly.

Frankly, both things are true, to some extent.

The best and worst thing about R is that it is open-source and there is no single company that is responsible for R or your [click to continue…]

{ 0 comments }

What is the intercept for each individual in a random slope model?

In this video I will answer a question from a recent webinar Random Intercept and Random Slope Models.

We are answering questions here because we had over 500 people live on the webinar so we didn’t have time to get through all the questions.

Read the full article →

Impact of Covariance Terms on Random Slope Model

In this video I will answer a question from a recent webinar Random Intercept and Random Slope Models.

We are answering questions here because we had over 500 people live on the webinar so we didn’t have time to get through all the questions.

Read the full article →

September 2017 Member Webinar: Quantile Regression: Going Beyond the Mean

Quantiles (the median, 25th percentile, etc.) are valuable statistical descriptors, but their usefulness doesn’t stop there.

In regression analysis, quantiles can also help answer a broader set of research questions than standard linear regression.

In standard linear regression, the focus is on predicting the mean of a response (or dependent) variable, given a set of predictor variables.

For example, standard linear regression can help us understand how age predicts the mean income of a study population.

Contrast this with quantile regression, which allows us to go beyond the mean of the response variable. Now we can understand how predictor variables predict the entire distribution of the response variable, or one or more relevant features (e.g., center, spread, shape) of this distribution.

Read the full article →

How to Use the Fitted Mixed Model to Calculate Predicted Values

In this video I will answer a question from a recent webinar Random Intercept and Random Slope Models.

We are answering questions here because we had over 500 people live on the webinar so we didn’t have time to get through all the questions.

Read the full article →

How to Interpret the Coefficients of Fixed Effects in Random Slope Models

In this video I will answer a question from a recent webinar Random Intercept and Random Slope Models.

We are answering questions here because we had over 500 people live on the webinar so we didn’t have time to get through all the questions.

Read the full article →

Why Call a Model with a Random Intercept and Slope a Random Slope Model?

In this video I will answer a question from a recent webinar Random Intercept and Random Slope Models.

We are answering questions here because we had over 500 people live on the webinar so we didn’t have time to get through all the questions.

Read the full article →

How to Produce Intercepts if the Random Slope Model Produces a Variance Estimate, Not Coefficients

In this video I will answer a question from a recent webinar Random Intercept and Random Slope Models.

We are answering questions here because we had over 500 people live on the webinar so we didn’t have time to get through all the questions.

Read the full article →

Is a Random Intercept Different in Each Treatment Group?

In this video I will answer a question from a recent webinar Random Intercept and Random Slope Models.

We are answering questions here because we had over 500 people live on the webinar so we didn’t have time to get through all the questions.

Read the full article →

August 2017 Member Webinar: Making Sense of Statistical Distributions

If your statistical training was typical, it centered on the normal distribution and models that assume the data are normal.

And while the normal distribution is incredibly helpful in many applications, it’s easy to forget that it isn’t so “normal” when dealing with actual data.

So… what do you do when the normal distribution just doesn’t work?

Read the full article →